How to Help Fight Climate Change: Sustainable Living in LA

The weather’s been frighteningly unpredictable recently. Sadly, climate change is to blame for it. California may be known for being a sunny state but the gray overcasts and bomb cyclones that’ve been happening recently may just get intense or happen more frequently. On the flip side, there are ways we can prevent climate change from worsening. If you’re an Angeleno, there are simple ways that can make sustainable living in LA easier.

Is Climate Change Real?

You might’ve heard of the hilarious conspiracy theory that climate change is one big lie. But the experts (who — needless to say — devoted YEARS of their lives learning what they know) beg to differ. Climate change is indeed very real. Because of these man-made errors of ways, we now have to deal with global warming, rising sea levels, and the Antarctic ice melting.

How Can I Help Fight Climate Change as an Individual?

You don’t have to be old enough to vote or drive to make an impact on the globe. That said, if you’re a parent of young kids, you can start teaching them easy-to-adapt habits like recycling and donating their old toys. You also don’t have to own a huge land just to plant trees. In fact, your backyard is enough; if you live in downtown LA, you can transform your balcony into a sustainable nook.

Tips on Living Sustainably in LA:
Use What You Already Have

Most eco-conscious people often say that we go “plastic-free.” And you’ve probably also seen those aesthetic glass and bamboo containers that some influencers have in their fridge and pantry — but if you’re headed to the nearest store just to get your hands on those, it’s not a sustainable thing to do! Don’t feel bad for still having plastic containers.

You can still use containers you already have because it’s better than you throwing them away. Because where do you think it’ll go? — the landfill! Be conscious about what you dispose of as you don’t always have to purchase “eco-friendly” alternatives all the time. This goes for your clothes as well — fast fashion should be a no-no!

Buy Used

If your washing machine stopped working or your fridge is on the fritz, consider checking your local classifieds for a suitable replacement. Buying used is a great step toward more sustainable living as it keeps items out of the landfill. Got kids? Lots of parents sell their children’s outgrown but perfectly-good clothing online for cheap. And what could be better than helping the environment while also saving a buck!

Give, Donate, and/or Volunteer for a Sustainable Cause

What even is LA without our avocados and lemons? But if you have way too much in your backyard, you can give it to neighbors or donate them to also help fight food insecurity. While of course, planting is always one of the best things you can do to help mother earth, your efforts will not be that effective if you’re throwing away food.

Opt for Other Means of Transportation

If your heart is on the verge of breaking because of the oil price hike, then maybe it’s best to end your relationship with your car for now (or forever). It was probably…quite literally, a “toxic” relationship anyway; you can do your part in reducing carbon pollution produced by vehicles as it amounts to 27% of the country’s greenhouse gas emissions. Also, c’mon! This is Los Angeles! Nobody will think it’s weird if you whip out a lowrider bicycle!

Go Hard and Go Green!

We’ve heard of the usual tips — plant more trees and reduce plastic waste. These habits are not — we repeat — NOT less important than the ones listed above. But these are not the only ways you can fight climate change. If you think you’re not making an impact on a global scale, you can start sustainable living in LA first. After all, it’s our job to protect our beautiful coastline. And the world needs our avocados!

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